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Saturday, February 1, 2020 | History

1 edition of Maxims, characters and reflections found in the catalog.

Maxims, characters and reflections

Maxims, characters and reflections

critical, satyrical, and moral

by

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Published by Printed for J. and R. Tonson in London .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Maxims,
  • Puritans

  • Edition Notes

    Other titlesPuritan collection of English and American literature
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxvi, 268 p. ;
    Number of Pages268
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL25471000M

    As an antidote to this poison of corruption Goethe pointed to the ancient world, and bid us study there the types of the loftiest manhood. It is in this belief that I hope the present translation may help in a small way to increase the direct knowledge of him in this country. There is no 'overkill. Rochefoucauld left behind him only two works, the one, Memoirs of his own time, the other the Maxims. I am ex- tremely reserved to those I do not know, and I am not very open with the greater part of those I do.

    And the stylists who neglect plain language for a mosaic of curious phrase and overstrained epithet, may profitably remember that, as Goethe here says, "it is not language in itself which is correct or forcible or elegant, but the mind that is embodied in it. The ages have always remained alike. It is easy to read them in an hour and forget them as soon; easy to view them with a tepid interest as the work of a great author; but no one will fully understand the value of any of them, who has not experience enough to know its truth. I have observed that on awakening from error a man turns again to truth as with new vigour.

    In deciding what shall be omitted, there is no difficulty with maxims which time has shown to be wrong or defective; they have only an historical interest. Our greediness so often troubles us, making us run after so many things at the same time, that while we too eagerly look after the least we miss the greatest. It is diversity of temperament dealing with partial knowledge that makes so many and such various doctrines. I fear but few things, and I do not fear death in the least. The envy of NOT possessing it, consoles and softens its regrets by the contempt it evinces for those who pos- sess it, and we refuse them our homage, not being able to detract from them what attracts that of the rest of the world.


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Maxims, characters and reflections book

Playful, yet serious, humorous, ironic yet direct, poetic yet philosophical, the Maxims penetrate to themes at the center of reflection and judgment about the human situation. Nobody deserves to be praised for goodness unless he is strong enough to be bad, for any other goodness is usually merely inertia or lack of will-power.

But as youth will always be too forward and old age too backward, the really mature man is always hemmed in between them, and has to resort to strange devices to make his way through.

This sixth edition was published by Claude Barbin, and the Characters and reflections book editions since that time have been too nu- merous to be enumerated.

There is perhaps no nation that is fitter for the process of self-development; so that it has proved of the greatest advantage to Germany to have obtained the notice of the world so late. If a man pays particular attention to this spot and is absorbed in it, he falls into a state of mental sickness, has presentiments of "things of another world," which are, in reality, no things at all; possessing neither form nor limit, but alarming him like dark, empty tracts of night, and pursuing him as something more than phantoms, if he does not tear himself free from them.

The charge comes, as a rule, from those who judge life by the needs and duties of a young girl, and they confound the whole of morality—character and conduct in all relations to one's fellow-men—with one section of it.

The maxims deal, not alone with Life and Character, where most of them are admirable, but also with certain aspects of Science and Art; and these are matters in which I could exercise no judgment myself, although I understood that, while many of the maxims on Science and Art were attractive, they were not all of great merit.

The best policy of those in power would be so to moderate this conflict as to let it right itself without the destruction of either element.

How often can we meet some one to whom we owe gratitude, without thinking of it! But the man has every reason to become a sceptic: he does well to doubt whether the means he has chosen to his end are the right ones. He is always in contact with realities, always aiming at truth; and he takes a kindly and a generous view of the world.

Its best answer is ar- rived at by reversing the predicate and the subject, and you at once form a contradictory maxim equally true, our vices are most frequently but virtues disguised.

Some examples from both are given in the notes to this trans- lation.

Reflections: or Sentences and Moral Maxims by La Rochefoucauld (1678): Let’s get cynical

Still the written word has this advantage, that it lasts and can await the time Maxims it is allowed to take effect. We are not born, as he said to Eckermann, to solve the problems of the world, but to find out where the problem begins, and then to keep within the limits of what we can grasp.

Some were certainly composed between the ages of fifty and sixty; more still between that and seventy; while there is evidence, both internal and external, proving that many and perhaps most of them were his final reflections on life and the world. I do not dislike an argument, and I often of my own free will engage in one; but I generally back my opinion with too much warmth, and sometimes, when the wrong side is advocated against me, from the strength of my zeal for reason, I become a little un- reasonable myself.

Anything is amphibious if you can get it back out of the water. But it is easy to talk, easy to give advice to oneself and others.Get this from a library!

Maxims, characters, and reflections, critical, satyrical, and moral. [Fulke Greville; Pre Imprint Collection (Library of Congress)].

Maxims: Life and Character

Feb 26,  · Whatever the case, the Maxims is that rare book that repays both superficial and deep interpretive dives, and for the education it has provided to everyone from toiling students in French to thinkers of the highest rank, like Nietzsche, it deserves a place in the Western atlasbowling.com: David Bahr.

Oct 30,  · atlasbowling.com - Buy Collected Maxims and Other Reflections (Oxford World's Classics) book online at best prices in India on atlasbowling.com Read Collected Maxims and Other Reflections (Oxford World's Classics) book reviews & author details Reviews: 5.

Maxims La Rochefoucauld. This is the first-ever French-English edition of La Rochefoucauld’s Réflexions, ou sentences et maximes morales, long known in English simply as the atlasbowling.com translation, the first to appear in forty years, is completely new and aims – unlike all previous versions – at being as literal as possible.

Reflections; or Sentences and Moral Maxims (French:Réflexions ou sentences et maximes morales) is a collection of aphorisms written by French nobleman François de La Rochefoucauld between and Quotes []. as translated by L. Tancock.

Les grandes âmes ne sont pas celles qui ont moins de passions et plus de vertus que les âmes communes, mais celles seulement qui ont de plus grands. Books from that period are often spoiled by imperfections that did not exist in the original. Imperfections could be in the form of blurred text, photographs, or missing pages.

It is highly unlikely that this would occur with one of our books. You're reviewing: Maxims, Characters, and Reflections, Critical, Satyrical, and Moral. Name. Email.